Penn State Undergraduate Admissions Penn State University

4-Year Baccalaureate Majors

Majors by Area of Interest


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Administration of Justice (Start at any Campus and Finish: DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Hazleton, Schuylkill, Wilkes-Barre)

The bachelor of arts degree provides students with a broadly based liberal arts education focused on the understanding and analysis of justice systems. Having grappled with the many dilemmas and controversies presented by the problems of administering justice in a complex society, graduates of this program are given the background to be educated, thoughtful, and intelligent citizens.

The bachelor of science degree is intended to prepare students for careers in the administration of justice. Two emphases are provided, one for students interested in entry-level employment in justice agencies and one for students interested in academic or research positions and who may seek graduate education before beginning employment.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Administration of Justice (Start at any Campus and Finish: Beaver, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Hazleton, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, Wilkes-Barre)

The bachelor of arts degree provides students with a broadly based liberal arts education focused on the understanding and analysis of justice systems. Having grappled with the many dilemmas and controversies presented by the problems of administering justice in a complex society, graduates of this program are given the background to be educated, thoughtful, and intelligent citizens.

The bachelor of science degree is intended to prepare students for careers in the administration of justice. Two emphases are provided, one for students interested in entry-level employment in justice agencies and one for students interested in academic or research positions and who may seek graduate education before beginning employment.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Anthropology (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

Anthropology is a holistic scientific discipline with links to the humanities. Anthropologists document, describe, and explain the physical and cultural differences of societies, both past and present. Anthropology sees the individual as part of a larger social order that both impinges upon and is molded by those who belong to it. Anthropology investigates how cultures interact and relate within specific economic, political, and ecological frameworks over time. The bachelor of arts major focuses on the biological and cultural variations of human populations through archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. In addition to class work, students receive practical training in laboratory and fieldwork.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Archaeological Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

This degree provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, field methods, and laboratory science. It offers students the skills and competencies needed to pursue careers in cultural resource management. Students planning futures in nonacademic archaeology should consider this degree or some of its recommended courses.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Biobehavioral Health (Start at any Campus and Finish: Greater Allegheny, Lehigh Valley, New Kensington.)

This major provides interdisciplinary training designed to integrate biological, behavioral, and social science approaches to the study of human health and illness. Emphasis is placed on the study of physical health. The goal of this major is to help students become familiar with multiple perspectives, approaches, and methods needed to address and solve problems of human health and illness. Students may select supporting courses that will fulfill requirements for admission to graduate and professional programs. This major helps graduates prepare for entry-level jobs in a range of biomedical and health-related areas, including as research assistants, laboratory managers, biomedical product representatives, and in technical support positions in biomedical and health-related fields. This major also provides excellent preparation for advanced study in natural and social science disciplines and related professional areas such as epidemiology, public health, environmental health and safety, and human services.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Biobehavioral Health (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park; Start and Finish at World Campus)

This major provides interdisciplinary training designed to integrate biological, behavioral, and social science approaches to the study of human health and illness. Emphasis is placed on the study of physical health. The goal of this major is to help students become familiar with multiple perspectives, approaches, and methods needed to address and solve problems of human health and illness. Students may select supporting courses that will fulfill requirements for admission to graduate and professional programs. This major helps graduates prepare for entry-level jobs in a range of biomedical and health-related areas, including as research assistants, laboratory managers, biomedical product representatives, and in technical support positions in biomedical and health-related fields. This major also provides excellent preparation for advanced study in natural and social science disciplines and related professional areas such as epidemiology, public health, environmental health and safety, and human services.
(College of Health and Human Development)

College of Health & Human Development

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Biological Anthropology (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

The bachelor of science degree program provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, and laboratory science. It helps students develop the skills and competencies needed to pursue graduate study or careers in professions associated with biological anthropology. Students contemplating futures in biomedical or forensic sciences should consult with Penn State’s Premedicine Office or a specific forensic science graduate program to make certain that additional courses in organic chemistry and physics that are required for admission are completed.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Communication Arts and Sciences (Start at any Campus and Finish: Brandywine, York)

This major provides increased understanding and practice in the ways humans use symbols to influence people and the world around them. The ability to communicate effectively with others in personal, social, work, and multicultural situations is essential in modern society. A student of Communication Arts and Sciences will learn to think critically, analyze and solve problems, understand and manage conflict, argue persuasively, influence people, form and keep relationships, give effective presentations, and participate in the civic and political life of a community. The flexibility of the program offers preparation for a variety of careers such as administration, law, business, health, and human services fields. A degree in Communication Arts and Sciences also lends itself well to a concurrent degree program in which students prepare themselves in several fields of study.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Communication Arts and Sciences (Start at any Campus and Finish: Berks)

This major provides increased understanding and practice in the ways humans use symbols to influence people and the world around them. The ability to communicate effectively with others in personal, social, work, and multicultural situations is essential in modern society. A student of Communication Arts and Sciences will learn to think critically, analyze and solve problems, understand and manage conflict, argue persuasively, influence people, form and keep relationships, give effective presentations, and participate in the civic and political life of a community. The flexibility of the program offers preparation for a variety of careers such as administration, law, business, health, and human services fields. A degree in Communication Arts and Sciences also lends itself well to a concurrent degree program in which students prepare themselves in several fields of study.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Communication Arts and Sciences (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

From a department that spans the humanities and social sciences, CAS majors learn to think critically, analyze public discourse, conduct empirical studies to test communication theories, argue persuasively, influence people, form and keep relationships, and participate in the civic life of a community. CAS courses prepare students to thrive in an increasingly message-rich and interconnected world. The CAS major is not designed as training programs in advertising, journalism, public relations, or mass media production. An undergraduate degree in CAS equips students for careers in public affairs, sales, social science research, advocacy, market analysis, and human resources, as well as for advanced professional or graduate study.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Communication Arts and Sciences B.S. (Start at Any Campus and Finish at University Park)
This major provides increased understanding and practice in the ways humans use symbols to influence people and the world around them. The ability to communicate effectively with others in personal, social, work and multicultural situations is essential in modern society. A student of Communication Arts and Sciences will learn to think critically, analyze and solve problems, understand and manage conflict, argue persuasively, influence people, form and keep relationships, give effective presentations, and participate in the civic and political life of a community. The flexibility of the program offers preparation for a variety of careers such as administration, law, business, health, and human services fields. A CAS degree also lends itself well to a concurrent degree program in which students prpeare themselves in several fields of study.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg, World Campus)

The major helps provide its graduates with the communications and analytical skills critical to succeed in criminal justice and related careers. Through an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of crime and society, the program also equips students to pursue graduate study in criminal justice or related disciplines, and educates students to become effective problem solvers as professionals in the field of criminal justice. The study of criminal justice is approached as an applied interdisciplinary science, teaching both the theoretical and the practical aspects of crime control and the administration of justice. The major provides students with the opportunity and assistance to acquire knowledge of the roles of policing, courts, laws, and corrections as they relate to both the adult and juvenile justice system. Students also learn the history, concepts, and critical issues related to the role of gender and race/ethnicity in the criminal justice system, victimology, and ethics in criminal justice.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice: Bachelor of Arts (Start at any Campus and Finish: Abington)

Students receiving a baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice should understand each of the three main components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships, be able to evaluate critically both current and future crime control policy proposals and criminal justice research, and understand the complexity of the crime phenomenon and its relationship to individual, social, and cultural factors. This major includes study in law enforcement, courts, and corrections—individually and as components of a system; theories of crime causation; and crime control policy. Students should expect reading, writing, and critical thinking skills to be rigorously applied and developed throughout the degree program. The bachelor of arts degree in Criminal Justice provides a broadly based liberal arts background for the study of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. The bachelor of science degree offers an opportunity for educational enrichment in fields not traditionally considered part of the liberal arts. Either degree is excellent preparation for a career in criminal justice, graduate, or professional study, or informed citizenship.
(Abington College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice (Start at any Campus and Finish: Berks)

Students receiving a baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice should understand each of the three main components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships, be able to evaluate critically both current and future crime control policy proposals and criminal justice research, and understand the complexity of the crime phenomenon and its relationship to individual, social, and cultural factors. This major includes study in law enforcement, courts, and corrections—individually and as components of a system; theories of crime causation; and crime control policy. Students should expect reading, writing, and critical thinking skills to be rigorously applied and developed throughout the degree program. The bachelor of arts degree in Criminal Justice provides a broadly based liberal arts background for the study of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. The bachelor of science degree offers an opportunity for educational enrichment in fields not traditionally considered part of the liberal arts. Either degree is excellent preparation for a career in criminal justice, graduate, or professional study, or informed citizenship.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice (Start at any Campus and Finish: Altoona)

Students receiving a baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice should understand each of the three main components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships, be able to evaluate critically both current and future crime control policy proposals and criminal justice research, and understand the complexity of the crime phenomenon and its relationship to individual, social, and cultural factors. This major includes study in law enforcement, courts, and corrections—individually and as components of a system; theories of crime causation; and crime control policy. Students should expect reading, writing, and critical thinking skills to be rigorously applied and developed throughout the degree program. The bachelor of arts degree in Criminal Justice provides a broadly based liberal arts background for the study of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. The bachelor of science degree offers an opportunity for educational enrichment in fields not traditionally considered part of the liberal arts. Either degree is excellent preparation for a career in criminal justice, graduate, or professional study, or informed citizenship.
(Altoona College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice: Bachelor of Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: Altoona)

Students receiving a baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice should understand each of the three main components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships, be able to evaluate critically both current and future crime control policy proposals and criminal justice research, and understand the complexity of the crime phenomenon and its relationship to individual, social, and cultural factors. This major includes study in law enforcement, courts, and corrections—individually and as components of a system; theories of crime causation; and crime control policy. Students should expect reading, writing, and critical thinking skills to be rigorously applied and developed throughout the degree program. The bachelor of arts degree in Criminal Justice provides a broadly based liberal arts background for the study of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. The bachelor of science degree offers an opportunity for educational enrichment in fields not traditionally considered part of the liberal arts. Either degree is excellent preparation for a career in criminal justice, graduate, or professional study, or informed citizenship.
(Altoona College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice: Bachelor of Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: Abington)

Students receiving a baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice should understand each of the three main components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships, be able to evaluate critically both current and future crime control policy proposals and criminal justice research, and understand the complexity of the crime phenomenon and its relationship to individual, social, and cultural factors. This major includes study in law enforcement, courts, and corrections—individually and as components of a system; theories of crime causation; and crime control policy. Students should expect reading, writing, and critical thinking skills to be rigorously applied and developed throughout the degree program. The bachelor of arts degree in Criminal Justice provides a broadly based liberal arts background for the study of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. The bachelor of science degree offers an opportunity for educational enrichment in fields not traditionally considered part of the liberal arts. Either degree is excellent preparation for a career in criminal justice, graduate, or professional study, or informed citizenship.
(Abington College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminal Justice: Bachelor of Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: Berks)

Students receiving a baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice should understand each of the three main components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships, be able to evaluate critically both current and future crime control policy proposals and criminal justice research, and understand the complexity of the crime phenomenon and its relationship to individual, social, and cultural factors. This major includes study in law enforcement, courts, and corrections—individually and as components of a system; theories of crime causation; and crime control policy. Students should expect reading, writing, and critical thinking skills to be rigorously applied and developed throughout the degree program. The bachelor of arts degree in Criminal Justice provides a broadly based liberal arts background for the study of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. The bachelor of science degree offers an opportunity for educational enrichment in fields not traditionally considered part of the liberal arts. Either degree is excellent preparation for a career in criminal justice, graduate, or professional study, or informed citizenship.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminology B.A. (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

This major provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, and the sciences. It offers preparation for pursuing further studies or finding employment where such knowledge is advantageous. Students contemplating futures in social science research, business, forensics, public service, and paralegal positions should consider this degree or some of its recommended courses. Either the B.A. or B.S. degree is suitable for students seeking entry level positions in the criminal justice system and for students interested in graduate and law school. Students interested in acquiring strong quantitative skills should consider the B.S. degree.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Criminology B.S. (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

This major provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, and the sciences. It offers preparation for pursuing further studies or finding employment where such knowledge is advantageous. Students contemplating futures in social science research, business, forensics, public service, and paralegal positions should consider this degree or some of its recommended courses. Either the B.A. or B.S. degree is suitable for students seeking entry level positions in the criminal justice system and for students interested in graduate and law school.
Students interested in acquiring strong quantitative skills should consider the B.S. degree.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Earth Science and Policy (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

This major is intended to bridge the gap between the physical, natural sciences (the earth sciences) and the social sciences, with the understanding that intelligent, effective solutions to environmental problems will require people who grasp the scientific and social dimensions of environmental problems.

Students develop a sense of community through a set of common upper level courses and they gain practical experience through a mandatory internship course. A variety of options are offered to enable greater depth of study in aspects of science and policy related to water and land use, climate change, and energy; a general option is also available.

This major will provide an excellent preparation for careers in environmental law, environmental consulting, and non-profit organizations engaged in the science and policy of environmental issues. This major will also serve as a strong basis for postgraduate studies in environmental science and policy.

(College of Earth and Mineral Sciences)

 

College of Earth & Mineral Sciences

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Economics (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

This major is designed for those who seek a broad understanding of the operation of the economic system and training in the methods and uses of economic analysis. Graduates are equipped for employment in many areas of business operations, labor unions, and agencies of government at all levels; and to undertake the graduate work necessary to become professional economists.
Students may choose either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science program. An honors program is also offered.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Economics (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

This major is designed for those who seek a broad understanding of the operation of the economic system and training in the methods and uses of economic analysis. Graduates are equipped for employment in many areas of business operations, labor unions, and agencies of government at all levels; and to undertake the graduate work necessary to become professional economists.
The B.S. degree program is intended for students with a strong interest in quantitative skills. An honors program is also offered.
(College of Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Energy and Sustainability Policy(Start and Finish: World Campus)

The Online Bachelor of Arts degree in Energy and Sustainability Policy will prepare students to compete for new careers in the growing and evolving energy field. Students will master the knowledge and skills needed to gather, analyze, synthesize, and communicate diverse information about emerging global trends in energy policy, technology, and economics. Emphasizing research skills, communication skills, foreign language and international competencies.
(College of Earth and Mineral Sciences)

College of Earth & Mineral Sciences

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Energy Sustainability Policy B.S. (Start and Finish: World Campus)
The Bachelor of Science degree in Energy and Sustainability Policy (ESP) is an interdisciplinary program, preparing students for careers in the evolving policy sector of the energy and sustainability fields, especially where strong science, business, and analytical skills are required. The B.S. program prescribes coursework in areas including energy sources, uses, and technologies; sustainability principles and practices; climate change; and, policy development and analysis. Students select additional courses in energy and science; analysis and technology; business and management; and, ethics, leadership and communications. ESP B.S. educational objectives emphasize five areas of student competency: (1) energy industry knowledge; (2) a sustainability ethic; (3) analytical skills; (4) communication skills; and (5) global perspective. The ESP B.S. program prepares students with knowledge and skills valued by many types of organizations, including commercial firms, government agencies, public utilities, regulatory bodies, nonprofit and advocacy groups, and energy and trade organizations.
(College of Earth and Mineral Sciences)

College of Earth & Mineral Sciences

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Geography (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

Geography is both a socialbehavioral and an environmental science. Geographers describe, analyze, and explain the arrangement of the human and physical features on the Earth’s surface. The Liberal Arts major stresses the social and behavioral aspects of geography; the Earth and Mineral Sciences major stresses the discipline’s environmental perspectives. Both majors provide training in descriptive and analytical skills such as map reading, cartography, and statistics. Graduates may find employment in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies or in private firms that specialize in marketing and environmental research. The major can provide preparation for a career in business, industry, or government. Geographers with bachelor’s degrees are currently being placed in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies and in private firms that specialize in planning and development or in environmental and socioeconomic analysis.
(College of Earth and Mineral Sciences)

College of Earth & Mineral Sciences

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Global and International Studies B.A.  (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)
The interdisciplinary B.A. degree in Global and International Studies is intended to prepare students for lives and careers in a world that is increasingly interdependent. It reflects a “One World” concept that emphasizes the importance of global perspectives, international communication, and study or working experience abroad. The major combines the expertise of multiple disciplines, including the Social Sciences and the Humanities, to suggest a variety of methods for understanding the dynamic issues facing human beings across the globe. The structure of the major also recognizes the fact that the vast majority of the world's people live in regions other than the European and North American spheres, and that a knowledge of non-Anglophone cultures is an important form of preparation for global citizenship.

The major develops transnational and trans-regional literacy, drawing on coursework both in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to focus on questions of globalization, ethical imagination, and ways to engage peoples and cultures in local terms. Students learn to situate global trends, both macro and micro in nature, in relation to other historical processes. Most courses for the GLIS major will demonstrate a global or regional (rather than national) perspective and address a central topic in one of five designated Pathways: Human rights, Culture and Identity, Global Conflict, Wealth and Inequality, and Health and Environment.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Global and International Studies B.S. (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)
The interdisciplinary Bachelor of Science degree in Global and International Studies is intended to prepare students for lives and careers in a world that is increasingly interdependent. It reflects a “One World” concept that emphasizes the importance of global perspectives, international communication, and study or working experience abroad. The major combines the expertise of multiple disciplines, including the Social Sciences and the Humanities, to suggest a variety of methods for understanding the dynamic issues facing human beings across the globe. The structure of the major also recognizes the fact that the vast majority of the world's people live in regions other than the European and North American spheres, and that a knowledge of non-Anglophone cultures is an important form of preparation for global citizenship.

The major develops transnational and trans-regional literacy, drawing on coursework both in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to focus on questions of globalization, ethical imagination, and ways to engage peoples and cultures in local terms. Students learn to situate global trends, both macro and micro in nature, in relation to other historical processes. Most courses for the GLIS major will demonstrate a global or regional (rather than national) perspective and address a central topic in one of five designated Pathways: Human rights, Culture and Identity, Global Conflict, Wealth and Inequality, and Health and Environment.

The B.S. degree requires six credits in quantitative competencies appropriate to the social sciences. The B.S. degree may include a significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Health Policy and Administration (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

This major helps students prepare for management and policy positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care at reasonable cost. All HPA students complete an internship in a health care-related setting, giving them valuable experience and contacts in the industry. HPA students study a multidisciplinary curriculum that prepares them to work in many health care organizations including: health care providers; health insurers; health care consultants; health care supply companies; health services research and policy organizations; and local, state, and federal health agencies. HPA students have also used the degree to prepare for graduate study in business, law, medicine or allied health fields, health administration health services research or policy, and public health.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Health Policy and Administration (Start at any Campus and Finish:Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto)

 This major helps students prepare for management and policy positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care at reasonable cost. All Health Policy and Administration students complete an internship in a health care-related setting, giving them valuable experience and contacts in the industry. Health Policy and Administration students study a multidisciplinary curriculum that prepares them to work in many health care organizations including: health care providers; health insurers; health care consultants; health care supply companies; health services research and policy organizations; and local, state, and federal health agencies. Health Policy and Administration students have also used the degree to prepare for graduate study in business, law, medicine or allied health fields, health administration health services research or policy, and public health.

(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Health Policy and Administration (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park; Start at World Campus and Finish at World Campus)

This major helps students prepare for management and policy positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care at reasonable cost. All HPA students complete an internship in a health care-related setting, giving them valuable experience and contacts in the industry. HPA students study a multidisciplinary curriculum that prepares them to work in many health care organizations including: health care providers; health insurers; health care consultants; health care supply companies; health services research and policy organizations; and local, state, and federal health agencies. HPA students have also used the degree to prepare for graduate study in business, law, medicine or allied health fields, health administration health services research or policy, and public health.
(College of Health and Human Development)

College of Health & Human Development

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Human Development and Family Studies(Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

This major is a multidisciplinary program that examines the development of individuals and families across the life span. It enables students to prepare for professional, managerial, or scientific roles in health and human services professions, in public and nonprofit agencies, and in business and industry, as well as for advanced professional or graduate study. Courses emphasize biological, psychological, social/cultural, and economic aspects of development. Through course work and undergraduate internships or research projects. students develop skills relevant to career objectives, such as counseling, human assessment, program planning and evaluation, and research. Two options are available within the major: Life Span Human Services and Life Span Developmental Science.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Human Development and Family Studies (Start at any Campus and Finish: Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette,, Mont Alto, Shenango, Worthington Scranton, York)

This major is a multidisciplinary program that examines the development of individuals and families across the life span. It enables students to prepare for professional, managerial, or scientific roles in health and human services professions, in public and nonprofit agencies, and in business and industry, as well as for advanced professional or graduate study. Courses emphasize biological, psychological, social/cultural, and economic aspects of development. Through course work and undergraduate internships or research projects, students develop skills relevant to career objectives, such as counseling, human assessment, program planning and evaluation, and research. Two options are available within the major: Life Span Human Services and Life Span Developmental Science.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Human Development and Family Studies (Start at any Campus and Finish: Altoona)

This major is a multidisciplinary program that examines the development of individuals and families across the life span. It enables students to prepare for professional, managerial, or scientific roles in health and human services professions, in public and nonprofit agencies, and in business and industry, as well as for advanced professional or graduate study. Courses emphasize biological, psychological, social/cultural, and economic aspects of development. Through course work and undergraduate internships or research projects, students develop skills relevant to career objectives, such as counseling, human assessment, program planning and evaluation, and research. Two options are available within the major: Life Span Human Services and Life Span Developmental Science.
(Altoona College,)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Human Development and Family Studies (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, Start and Finish at World Campus)

This major is a multidisciplinary program that examines the development of individuals and families across the life span. It enables students to prepare for professional, managerial, or scientific roles in health and human services professions, in public and nonprofit agencies, and in business and industry, as well as for advanced professional or graduate study. Courses emphasize biological, psychological, social/cultural, and economic aspects of development. Through course work and undergraduate internships or research projects, students develop skills relevant to career objectives, such as counseling, human assessment, program planning and evaluation, and research. Two options are available within the major: Life Span Human Services and Life Span Developmental Science.
(College of Health and Human Development)

College of Health & Human Development

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Information Sciences and Technology (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, World Campus, Worthington Scranton, York and Finish: Harrisburg)

This major is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the degree program focuses on building an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; helps students prepare for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engages students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and work in teams. All this is done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies of the field. Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in for availability.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Information Sciences and Technology (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, World Campus, Worthington Scranton and Finish: Beaver, Brandywine, Greater Allegheny, Hazelton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensignton, Schuylkill, Wilkes Barre, Worthington Scranton, York )

This major is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the degree program focuses on building an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; helps students prepare for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engages students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and work in teams. All this is done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies of the field. Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in for availability.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Information Sciences and Technology (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, World Campus, Worthington Scranton, York and Finish: Abington)

This major is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the degree program focuses on building an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; helps students prepare for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engages students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and work in teams. All this is done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies of the field. Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in for availability.
(Abington College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Information Sciences and Technology (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, World Campus, Worthington Scranton, York and Finish: Berks)

This major is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the degree program focuses on building an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; helps students prepare for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engages students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and work in teams. All this is done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies of the field. Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in for availability.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Information Sciences and Technology (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, World Campus, Worthington Scranton, York and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

This major is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new "Information Age." Specifically, the degree program focuses on building an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; helps students prepare for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engages students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and work in teams. All this is done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies of the field. Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in for availability.
(College of Information Sciences and Technology)

College of Information Sciences & Technology

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Information Systems (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

This major prepares students to enter rapidly expanding fields associated with technology. This includes programming, systems analysis and design, database administration, network management, support services and training, and management of information resources. Students obtain competence both in information technology and in business theory. Each student’s background is complemented with basic business instruction in accounting, marketing, management, and finance. With business and non-business electives, the program is designed to develop necessary skills to be an effective information systems employee.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Integrated Social Sciences (Start and Finish at World Campus)
The social sciences are concerned with the study of society and the relations among individuals and institutions within society. The multi-disciplinary Bachelor of Science in Integrated Social Sciences synthesizes the broad sweep of the content, theories, and methodologies of the social sciences. The program draws on core social science disciplines: Anthropology, Communication Arts and Sciences, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. A final capstone portfolio will document integration and synthesis of major themes explored in the program.

Upon completing the program of study, students should be able to articulate the varied theoretical and applied methodologies and interrelationships across the social sciences; communicate effectively using the language and constructs of the social sciences; apply critical thinking in analyzing and applying social science perspectives to society’s problems; demonstrate the ability to understand, evaluate, and critique the results of social science quantitative and qualitative research; formulate, debate, and articulate arguments about social phenomena; and recognize and solve ethical dilemmas in social contexts.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

International Politics (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park; Start at World Campus and Finish at World Campus)

This major, administered within the Department of Political Science, is designed to provide students with a broad, comprehensive education in international politics with options in International Relations, International Political Economy, and National Security. While most of the required courses are in the areas of international and comparative politics, the curriculum includes courses in economics, geography, risk analysis, and history. The major provides an opportunity to study in detail a variety of crucial contemporary issues as well as analysis of foreign and economic policy making and security issues in the United States and other nations. The major prepares students for career opportunities with U.S. government executive agencies dealing with foreign affairs, international and homeland security, and the international economy; relevant committees of the U.S. Congress; multinational corporations, banks, and consulting firms; and international organizations. The major also provides preparation for law, business, and graduate schools.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Labor and Employment Relations (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

This major permits students to undertake a study of work and the employment relationship in the context of a liberal arts education. A broad foundation of theoretical and professional knowledge is provided through a multidisciplinary approach. The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees draw on the perspectives of industrial relations, economics, history, law, sociology, and psychology. This focus includes the nature and functions of the institutions involved in the employment relationship. The Bachelor of Science degree requires more course work in quantification than the Bachelor of Arts degree.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Law and Society (Start and Finish: World Campus)

The bachelor of arts major in Law and Society is an interdisciplinary program intended for adult students who want to acquire a greater understanding of law and the legal systems of this country. Students study legal principles and processes from different perspectives to gain an integrated understanding of the historical, philosophical, political, and social foundations of law. Students may enroll in this program to perform their jobs more effectively or to pursue additional educational, career, or personal goals. This program would help students prepare to work competently within the legal system in a variety of public and private settings, to understand more fully the legal environment of the workplace, and to prepare for entry to law school.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

This major is for students interested in the Behrend College, but are undecided about which major they would like to select. Beginning studies with an "undecided" major allows students to explore the many different majors offered within this college and learn more about the specific disciplines that are available to them.

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

This major is for students interested in the College of the Liberal Arts, but are undecided about which major they would like to select. Beginning studies with an "undecided" major allows students to explore the many different majors offered within this college and learn more about the specific disciplines that are available to them.

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Political Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

The Political Science major offers the student an opportunity to understand not only American federal, state, and local governments, but also the political systems of other nations and their underlying philosophies. Courses are offered in American, comparative, and international politics, and in political theory and methodology. Internship opportunities are available.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Political Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: Altoona)

The Political Science major offers the student an opportunity to understand not only American federal, state, and local governments, but also the political systems of other nations and their underlying philosophies. Courses are offered in American, comparative, and international politics, and in political theory and methodology. Internship opportunities are available.
(Altoona College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Political Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: Behrend)

The discipline of political science consists of different related subfields, such as American government, international relations, public policy and administration, the study of how governments accomplish objectives, and comparative politics—the study of foreign government. The major offers students the opportunity to take course work in most subfields as well as seek practical experience through an internship. All students are encouraged to develop research and writing and statistical skills. Many students have continued their education in law or graduate school.
(The Behrend College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Political Science (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

The Political Science major offers the student an opportunity to understand not only American federal, state, and local governments, but also the political systems of other nations and their underlying philosophies. Courses are offered in American, comparative, and international politics, and in political theory and methodology. Internship opportunities are available.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Political Science B.S. (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science emphasizes the technical aspects of political science knowledge development and application. In addition to broad coursework in political science, students will complete courses in statistics and research design, advanced classes in social science methods and upper level political science courses that employ quantitative research skills in exploring substantive themes. Students have the opportunity to complete either a research practicum within the Political Science Department, an internship or a TA-ship. This degree will serve students who are interested in political science from the point of view of the practitioner, as well as those who are interested in acquiring practical skills relevant to a variety of careers in politics, government and business.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychological and Social Sciences (Start at any Campus and Finish: Abington)

Building on the interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary strengths of Penn State Abington, the Psychological and Social Sciences B.A. is designed to emphasize the social and behavioral sciences leading to an understanding of human behavior and its influence upon society, as well as the influence of social forces on individuals. The program is distinguished by its interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary course work and required field experience. The major is designed to help students prepare for a variety of career fields including human resources, business administration, mental health, and social work as well as for continued study in graduate or professional school.
(Abington College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychological and Social Sciences (Start at any Campus and Finish: Abington)

Building on the interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary strengths of Penn State Abington, the Psychological and Social Sciences B.S. is designed to respond to the demand for a program emphasizing the social and behavioral sciences leading to an understanding of human behavior and its influence upon society, as well as the influence of social forces on individuals. The program is distinguished by its interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary course work and required field experience. The degree program offers students a choice of course clusters focused on specialized areas such as social psychology, developmental studies, organizational behavior and leadership, bio-behavior and diversity, and counseling.

The B.S. provides a broad theoretical foundation in social and psychological theory as well as the opportunity to engage in supervised field experience. In addition, the B.S. degree emphasizes quantitative research skills and requires the completion of a senior thesis. The major is designed to prepare students for a variety of career fields including human resources, business administration, mental health, and social work, as well as for continued study in graduate or professional school.
(Abington College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Beaver, Brandywine, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Worthington Scranton, York)

The Psychology major will combine the knowledge, skills, and values of psychology with a liberal arts foundation. Students should develop a knowledge base consisting of concepts, theory, empirical findings, and trends within psychology; understand and apply basic research methods in psychology; use critical thinking and the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes; apply psychological principles to personal and social issues; and be able to understand the gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, culture, and class issues in psychological theory, research, and practice. Students should also develop information and computer competence, communication skills, and develop realistic ideas about how to implement their psychology education in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.

The major may lead to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. The B.A. degree incorporates a broad exposure to the many facets of the field of psychology, in addition to the B.A. requirements. The B.S. degree provides the same exposure to the field of psychology and adds options in Science and Business to prepare students for more specific career directions. Students in both degree programs may also prepare for graduate school; research experience with faculty members is encouraged for such students.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Altoona)

The Psychology major will combine the knowledge, skills, and values of psychology with a liberal arts foundation. Students should develop a knowledge base consisting of concepts, theory, empirical findings, and trends within psychology; understand and apply basic research methods in psychology; use critical thinking and the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes; apply psychological principles to personal and social issues; and be able to understand the gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, culture, and class issues in psychological theory, research, and practice. Students should also develop information and computer competence, communication skills, and develop realistic ideas about how to implement their psychology education in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.

The major may lead to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. The B.A. degree incorporates a broad exposure to the many facets of the field of psychology, in addition to the B.A. requirements. The B.S. degree provides the same exposure to the field of psychology and adds options in Science and Business to prepare students for more specific career directions. Students in both degree programs may also prepare for graduate school; research experience with faculty members is encouraged for such students.
(Altoona College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Behrend)

Psychology is both a scientific discipline and a profession. Its overall focus is the study of behavior, cognition, and affect, and their associated physiological processes. Research is vital to the discipline of psychology. Investigators collect, quantify, analyze, and interpret data in order to understand the principles and theories of human thought and behavior. As a profession, psychology involves the application of knowledge, skills, and techniques for the solution and prevention of individual and social problems. Bachelor-level graduates in psychology are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, industrial settings, and laboratories. However, many students continue study toward a master’s or a doctoral degree in psychology, while others go on to school in other disciplines, e.g., medical school or law school.

Students may select either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science program. The Bachelor of Arts degree requires more credits in the arts, humanities, and social sciences and proficiency in a second language. The Bachelor of Science program, in turn, offers two options. The General option is intended for students with a strong interest in science and requires more course work in the biological, physical, and mathematical sciences than does the Bachelor of Arts program. The Business option is designed for students who wish to combine their interests in business and psychology.
(The Behrend College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

This major is designed for students who want to learn about behavior, both normal and abnormal, how it is studied, and its relation to applied areas. Students are encouraged to conduct research with members of the faculty and/or take a practicum in an applied setting. Graduates are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, industrial settings, or laboratories. Others go on to professional school, e.g., medical school, law school, or continue working toward a master’s or a doctoral degree. Majors may elect either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science program.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

This major is designed for students who want to learn about behavior, normal and abnormal, how it is studied, and its relation to applied areas. Students are encouraged to conduct research with members of the faculty and/or take a practicum in an applied setting. Graduates are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, industrial settings, or laboratories. Others go on to professional school, e.g., medical school, law school, or continue their training in psychology working toward a master’s or a doctoral degree. Majors may elect either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science program.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Beaver, Brandywine, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, New Kensington, Worthington Scranton, Schuylkill, York)

The Psychology major will combine the knowledge, skills, and values of psychology with a liberal arts foundation. Students should develop a knowledge base consisting of concepts, theory, empirical findings, and trends within psychology; understand and apply basic research methods in psychology; use critical thinking and the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes; apply psychological principles to personal and social issues; and be able to understand the gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, culture, and class issues in psychological theory, research, and practice. Students should also develop information and computer competence, communication skills, and develop realistic ideas about how to implement their psychology education in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings. The major may lead to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree.

The B.A. degree incorporates a broad exposure to the many facets of the field of psychology, in addition to the B.A. requirements.

The B.S. degree provides the same exposure to the field of psychology and adds options in Science and Business to prepare students for more specific career directions. Students in both degree programs may also prepare for graduate school; research experience with faculty members is encouraged for such students.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Altoona)

The Psychology major will combine the knowledge, skills, and values of psychology with a liberal arts foundation. Students should develop a knowledge base consisting of concepts, theory, empirical findings, and trends within psychology; understand and apply basic research methods in psychology; use critical thinking and the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes; apply psychological principles to personal and social issues; and be able to understand the gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, culture, and class issues in psychological theory, research, and practice. Students should also develop information and computer competence, communication skills, and develop realistic ideas about how to implement their psychology education in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.

The major may lead to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. The B.A. degree incorporates a broad exposure to the many facets of the field of psychology, in addition to the B.A. requirements. The B.S. degree provides the same exposure to the field of psychology and adds options in Science and Business to prepare students for more specific career directions. Students in both degree programs may also prepare for graduate school; research experience with faculty members is encouraged for such students.
(Altoona College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Behrend)

Psychology is both a scientific discipline and a profession. Its overall focus is the study of behavior, cognition, and affect, and their associated physiological processes. Research is vital to the discipline of psychology. Investigators collect, quantify, analyze, and interpret data in order to understand the principles and theories of human thought and behavior. As a profession, psychology involves the application of knowledge, skills, and techniques for the solution and prevention of individual and social problems. Bachelor-level graduates in psychology are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, industrial settings, and laboratories. However, many students continue study toward a master’s or a doctoral degree in psychology, while others go on to school in other disciplines, e.g., medical school or law school.

Students may select either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science program. The Bachelor of Arts degree requires more credits in the arts, humanities, and social sciences and proficiency in a second language. The Bachelor of Science program, in turn, offers two options. The General option is intended for students with a strong interest in science and requires more course work in the biological, physical, and mathematical sciences than does the Bachelor of Arts program. The Business option is designed for students who wish to combine their interests in business and psychology.
(The Behrend College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park, World Campus)

This major is designed for students who want to learn about behavior, normal and abnormal, how it is studied, and its relation to applied areas. Students are encouraged to conduct research with members of the faculty and/or take a practicum in an applied setting. Graduates are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, industrial settings, or laboratories. Others go on to professional school, e.g., medical school, law school, or to continue their training in psychology working toward a master's or a doctoral degree. Majors may elect either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science program.

The B.S. degree program requires more course work in the sciences than the B.A. program, and students may select courses from one of four areas--mathematics/computer science, statistics, business, or biology--which may be taken instead of a foreign language.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Psychology, Applied (Start at any Campus and Finish: Berks)

This major is designed for students who are interested in a liberal arts degree with a concentration in applied psychology. The program features both active and collaborative classroom experiences in addition to intensive internship experiences, and is most appropriate for students who wish to develop a set of applied scientific and human relations skills that will prepare them for entry-level employment in a wide range of government and private human service organizations and agencies, and in business and industry. Because of the flexible and broad nature of the degree, students might also use this major as a preparation for graduate or professional school in business, human services, law, or the social sciences. This program differs most notably from traditional majors in psychology in three ways: it is intended for students who may not be planning to pursue a doctoral degree in psychology that would prepare them for a career as a psychologist; it requires that students learn and apply skills during 12 credits of internship experiences; and it requires that students demonstrate skill proficiency in a comprehensive assessment in order to graduate.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Public Policy (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

The Public Policy major is designed for students interested in policy issues, politics, public administration, and related areas like policy analysis and policy advocacy. The program explores critical issues facing our communities, the nation, and the world. Students receive the educational foundation for careers in the public sector, in government-related businesses, and in nonprofit organizations, as well as for graduate work in the fields of law, public administration, criminal justice, public policy, political science, and health care administration. Students may wish but are not required to pursue a concentration within the Public Policy major. The following concentrations are available: U.S. Public Policy; Law and Justice; and International Policy.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Rehabilitation and Human Services (Start at any Campus and Finish: Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Wilkes-Barre)

This major helps students prepare for entry-level positions in a variety of human service settings, especially those dealing with persons with physical, emotional, or mental disabilities. Graduates work in a variety of settings, including rehabilitation centers, sheltered workshops, drug and alcohol programs, senior citizens centers, community mental health and mental retardation programs, corrections systems, and hospitals. Increasing opportunities are available in private for-profit insurance programs for the industrially injured, and in rapidly emerging employee assistance programs within business and industry. Well-planned use of electives and internships allows for specialization. The program also helps students prepare for graduate study in many human service professional disciplines.
(University College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Rehabilitation and Human Services (Start at any Campus and Finish: Abington)

This major helps students prepare for entry-level positions in a variety of human service settings, especially those dealing with persons with physical, emotional, or mental disabilities. Graduates work in a variety of settings, including rehabilitation centers, sheltered workshops, drug and alcohol programs, senior citizens centers, community mental health and mental retardation programs, corrections systems, and hospitals. Increasing opportunities are available in private for-profit insurance programs for the industrially injured, and in rapidly emerging employee assistance programs within business and industry. Well-planned use of electives and internships allows for specialization. The program also helps students prepare for graduate study in many human service professional disciplines.
(Abington College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Rehabilitation and Human Services (Start at any Campus and Finish: Berks)

This major helps students prepare for entry-level positions in a variety of human service settings, especially those dealing with persons with physical, emotional, or mental disabilities. Graduates work in a variety of settings, including rehabilitation centers, sheltered workshops, drug and alcohol programs, senior citizens centers, community mental health and mental retardation programs, corrections systems, and hospitals. Increasing opportunities are available in private for-profit insurance programs for the industrially injured, and in rapidly emerging employee assistance programs within business and industry. Well-planned use of electives and internships allows for specialization. The program also helps students prepare for graduate study in many human service professional disciplines.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Rehabilitation and Human Services (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

This major helps students prepare for entry-level positions in a variety of human service settings, especially those dealing with persons with physical, emotional, or mental disabilities. Graduates work in a variety of settings, including rehabilitation centers, sheltered workshops, drug and alcohol programs, senior citizens centers, community mental health and mental retardation programs, corrections systems, and hospitals. Increasing opportunities are available in private for-profit insurance programs for the industrially injured, and in rapidly emerging employee assistance programs within business and industry. Well-planned use of electives and internships allows for specialization. The program also helps students prepare for graduate study in many human service professional disciplines.
(College of Education)

College of Education

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Security and Risk Analysis (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, Worthington Scrantons, York and Finish: Harrisburg)

The bachelor of science degree program in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define the area of security and related risk analyses. Courses in the major will engage students in the challenges and problems associated with assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology-related, and policy issues), as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk. The major provides grounding in the analysis and modeling efforts used in information search, visualization, and creative problem solving. This knowledge is supplemented through an examination of the legal, ethical, and regulatory issues related to security that includes analyzing privacy laws, internal control, and regulatory policies, as well as basic investigative processes and principles. Such understanding is applied to venues that include transnational terrorism, cyber crimes, financial fraud, risk mitigation, and security and crisis management. It also includes overviews of the information technology that plays a critical role in identifying, preventing, and responding to security-related events.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Security and Risk Analysis (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, Worthington Scrantons, York and Finish: Altoona)

The bachelor of science degree program in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define the area of security and related risk analyses. Courses in the major will engage students in the challenges and problems associated with assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology-related, and policy issues), as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk. The major provides grounding in the analysis and modeling efforts used in information search, visualization, and creative problem solving. This knowledge is supplemented through an examination of the legal, ethical, and regulatory issues related to security that includes analyzing privacy laws, internal control, and regulatory policies, as well as basic investigative processes and principles. Such understanding is applied to venues that include transnational terrorism, cyber crimes, financial fraud, risk mitigation, and security and crisis management. It also includes overviews of the information technology that plays a critical role in identifying, preventing, and responding to security-related events.
(Altoona College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Security and Risk Analysis (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, Worthington Scranton, York and Finish: Berks)

The bachelor of science degree program in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define the area of security and related risk analyses. Courses in the major will engage students in the challenges and problems associated with assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology-related, and policy issues), as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk. The major provides grounding in the analysis and modeling efforts used in information search, visualization, and creative problem solving. This knowledge is supplemented through an examination of the legal, ethical, and regulatory issues related to security that includes analyzing privacy laws, internal control, and regulatory policies, as well as basic investigative processes and principles. Such understanding is applied to venues that include transnational terrorism, cyber crimes, financial fraud, risk mitigation, and security and crisis management. It also includes overviews of the information technology that plays a critical role in identifying, preventing, and responding to security-related events.
(Berks College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Security and Risk Analysis (Start at Abington, Altoona, Beaver, Berks, Brandywine, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Shenango, University Park, Wilkes-Barre, Worthington Scranton, York and Finish: University Park; or Start and Finish at World Campus)

The bachelor of science degree program in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define the area of security and related risk analyses. Courses in the major will engage students in the challenges and problems associated with assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology-related, and policy issues), as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk. The major provides grounding in the analysis and modeling efforts used in information search, visualization, and creative problem solving. This knowledge is supplemented through an examination of the legal, ethical, and regulatory issues related to security that includes analyzing privacy laws, internal control, and regulatory policies, as well as basic investigative processes and principles. Such understanding is applied to venues that include transnational terrorism, cyber crimes, financial fraud, risk mitigation, and security and crisis management. It also includes overviews of the information technology that plays a critical role in identifying, preventing, and responding to security-related events.
(College of Information Sciences and Technology)

College of Information Sciences & Technology

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Social Data Analytics (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

Social Data Analytics is an interdisciplinary major that prepares students to participate in both a research environment where “big data” is a major source of insight into social and political processes, and an economy increasingly organized around data analytics. Students completing the major will have the technical skills to handle, analyze, apply and present big data, and the disciplinary knowledge to draw valid inferences from such information to address real world problems. The program integrates coursework in the social sciences with courses in statistics, mathematics, information science and computer science to develop the unique skill set necessary to conceptualize data sources in relation to the social conditions from which they arise; to think critically about big data in relation to specific problems; and to derive and test hypotheses through application of data tools and techniques. Students will gain valuable practical experience working with data through a capstone experience and participation in faculty research.

This major is intended to produce graduates who are big picture thinkers with the knowledge to formulate good questions and leverage vast stores of unstructured data in answering them. Students will be prepared for careers in government, business, healthcare, and industry. The major also provides a strong foundation for advanced study in social science, law, business and public policy.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Sociology (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

The major provides graduates with a sociological perspective on human behavior informed by exposure to different substantive areas of the field; an understanding of the structure of American society, its internal diversity, and its international context; an understanding of basic principles of the scientific method, statistics, research design, computer use, logic and critical thinking, and how these apply to the study of human behavior; and experience in posing sociological questions and collecting and analyzing data to bear on those questions. Graduates of this program have found positions in social research, social service agencies, government and business research and planning offices, other business positions (especially sales and marketing), or have entered graduate school in sociology, social work, policy analysis or law school. Students may choose either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree program.
(College ofthe Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Sociology (Start at any Campus and Finish: Harrisburg)

This major is intended for students who want a strong sociology background in preparation for work in government or social agencies or who are interested in graduate work in sociology. In addition to developing analytical and critical thinking skills, students will gain an understanding of various substantive areas of the field including social structure and institutions, social change, social class, gender, and race and ethnicity. Sociologists are employed in such diverse fields as social and human service agencies, nonprofit and advocacy organizations, research and policy work, telecommunications, human resource management, and college teaching. This major is appropriate for work in any environment where an understanding of social structures and social dynamics is required.
(Capital College)

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.

Sociology (Start at any Campus and Finish: University Park)

The major provides graduates with a sociological perspective on human behavior informed by exposure to different substantive areas of the field; an understanding of the structure of American society, its internal diversity, and its international context; an understanding of basic principles of the scientific method, statistics, research design, computer use, logic and critical thinking, and how these apply to the study of human behavior; and experience in posing sociological questions and collecting and analyzing data to bear on those questions. Graduates of this program have found positions in social research, social service agencies, government and business research and planning offices, other business positions (especially sales and marketing), or have entered graduate school in sociology, social work, policy analysis or law school. Students may choose either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree program.
(College of the Liberal Arts)

College of the Liberal Arts

Please see the Basic Admissions Requirements page for more information about high school and transfer requirements.